Author Topic: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?  (Read 339 times)

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Offline EddieE

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Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« on: February 28, 2017, 07:15:30 PM »
Do you guys use a barrel break-in procedure?

How thorough of a cleaning procedure do you use for the first cleaning (prior to shooting)?

I pulled the trigger a couple of times and oil splattered on my face from the bolt. The gun was covered in oil when I got it. I will clean the barrel, chamber, etc. and oil appropriately. Should I take the bolt apart and clean it? That seems excessive to me.

Knowing that I will keep this baby for a lifetime, I want to ensure I treat it right and have a lifetime of fun with it. If you have a procedure that works for you, please link it or outline it.

Thanks

« Last Edit: February 28, 2017, 08:42:42 PM by EddieE »

Offline SailDesign

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2017, 08:27:35 PM »
Usually, I read the manual, and if it doesn't advise a break-in, I just shoot it.     The oil spattering part sounds as though a wipe-down was in order, but my 455 says the bolt shouldn't need to be taken apart for normal cleaning.  I leave to your oil-spattered face to decide on that one. :)

Offline Boris_LA

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2017, 02:31:21 AM »
Clean it well before first time using (you already have done that).
Clean it again after the first outing and don't clean barrel anymore for hundreds/thousands of rounds or until you see the accuracy drop.
If you are not planning to shot it regularly, after range session pull one oiled patch and two - three dry patches. Nothing more than that needed. Next range trip it will take first 10-20 shots to condition the barrel and get your accuracy back.
Bolt - clean and light oil on the outside. While cleaning your rifle, just a wipe it down and put another LIGHT coat of oil.
Wipe the outside of entire rifle with silicon cloth or lite spray of ballistol and wipe before storing it.



Offline Ronnie

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2017, 02:08:33 PM »
Here u go not a bunch of secrets at all just common sense.More damage has been done to barrels from cleaning than shooting ask your gunsmith. :

http://riflebarrels.com/support/22-rimfire-maintenance/

R

Offline KnightSchneider

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2017, 08:34:14 PM »
I've never done a break in procedure for a rimfire.

I shoot a lot of .17HMR...usually 3-4000 rounds per year.  I will run a wet patch through the bore, then brush a couple strokes, then a couple dry patches - a couple times a year, and that's it.

Both my .17 cal CZ barrels just seem to shoot tighter and tighter every year - they settle more and more as they naturally polish.  I'm at around 8 or 9000 through one and about 5000 through the other...I'm guessing I'll get at least 20,000 very accurate rounds out of both of them...unless they fall off unexpectedly.

then i'll just buy another barrel.

Offline zormpas

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2017, 02:43:47 PM »
Sigh...

Here we go again...

This could be applied to ANY firearm, but there's seemingly more FUD involved when the firearm is a rimfire.

You should always clean your guns after every use - except when you shouldn't. Powder residue will corrode your barrel except you'll wear your barrel out cleaning it. Softer than gunmetal bronze and/or nylon brushes can't possibly wear your barrel out but never use cotton patches as they'll ruin the crown and wear the barrel prematurely. You should always coat the inside of a freshly cleaned barrel with gun oil, except that will hydro-lock your gun next time you fire it so you really should use {insert fave brand of CLP here}. Dirty barrels are far more accurate than clean ones except nothing centers like a freshly cleaned barrel. Barrel accuracy degrades, and corrosion sets in after the third round, except for the guy who has shot exactly 15,348,723 rounds since the last cleaning and his barrel looks brand new. The previous is only valid if you use {insert fave brand of ammo here}. If you use {insert hated brand of ammo here}, your barrel will tie itself into a knot, and your cat will barf on your computer keyboard. Match shooters clean their barrels every 10-15 rounds, except the champ who has never cleaned his 50 Y.O. gun. Hoppe's #9 was good enough for grandpa, its good enough for me; but its outdated and you really should use {insert fave CLP here}. You should only run patches with a loop unless you're using a jag. Never use bronze brushes, nylon ones are clearly inferior. You'll wear your gun out cleaning it, except you'll wear it out from the unburned grit and glass particles left by every shot! Don't ever let your cleaning rod touch the inside of the barrel as soft aluminum will damage a hard steel barrel, except that the aluminum oxide on the soft aluminum rod will abrade the barrel. But soft brass/bronze rods won't hurt anything except you should use stainless steel as it doesn't flex as much. Don't forget to always brush or swab from the breech to the muzzle as this is the way the bullet travels - except swabbing/brushing from the muzzle to the breech reverses the the "flow" of crud so it won't migrate from the chamber to the farthest parts of the barrel. If you shot corrosive ammo, spray Windex down the barrel but never use ammonia under these circumstances, put your gun in the dishwasher instead. A good, stiff cleaning rod is best; especially when it is a nice flexible cleaning cord. One should always use a 1 piece rod, the 3 sectioned ones travel better. Clean your gun at the range, but its OK to wait until you get home. Never use {whatever} to clean your rifle, it will cause flash rust within .0352 microseconds; its far better to use {another whatever} because it will cause buildup that will clog your barrel the very first time its used. Its best to use the {whatever military} cleaning technique except its outdated and ineffective; better to use the technique employed by {whatever police dept.} as everyone knows all cops' guns are perpetually dirty. The 15 step, all intensive, 3 hour, 18 patch method is best, just run 1 patch through the bbl and throw the gun back in the truck for next time.

That should pretty much sum up where this thread will end up going - did I miss anything?

Offline SailDesign

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2017, 03:02:11 PM »
Sigh...

Here we go again...

This could be applied to ANY firearm, but there's seemingly more FUD involved when the firearm is a rimfire.

You should always clean your guns after every use - except when you shouldn't. Powder residue will corrode your barrel except you'll wear your barrel out cleaning it. Softer than gunmetal bronze and/or nylon brushes can't possibly wear your barrel out but never use cotton patches as they'll ruin the crown and wear the barrel prematurely. You should always coat the inside of a freshly cleaned barrel with gun oil, except that will hydro-lock your gun next time you fire it so you really should use {insert fave brand of CLP here}. Dirty barrels are far more accurate than clean ones except nothing centers like a freshly cleaned barrel. Barrel accuracy degrades, and corrosion sets in after the third round, except for the guy who has shot exactly 15,348,723 rounds since the last cleaning and his barrel looks brand new. The previous is only valid if you use {insert fave brand of ammo here}. If you use {insert hated brand of ammo here}, your barrel will tie itself into a knot, and your cat will barf on your computer keyboard. Match shooters clean their barrels every 10-15 rounds, except the champ who has never cleaned his 50 Y.O. gun. Hoppe's #9 was good enough for grandpa, its good enough for me; but its outdated and you really should use {insert fave CLP here}. You should only run patches with a loop unless you're using a jag. Never use bronze brushes, nylon ones are clearly inferior. You'll wear your gun out cleaning it, except you'll wear it out from the unburned grit and glass particles left by every shot! Don't ever let your cleaning rod touch the inside of the barrel as soft aluminum will damage a hard steel barrel, except that the aluminum oxide on the soft aluminum rod will abrade the barrel. But soft brass/bronze rods won't hurt anything except you should use stainless steel as it doesn't flex as much. Don't forget to always brush or swab from the breech to the muzzle as this is the way the bullet travels - except swabbing/brushing from the muzzle to the breech reverses the the "flow" of crud so it won't migrate from the chamber to the farthest parts of the barrel. If you shot corrosive ammo, spray Windex down the barrel but never use ammonia under these circumstances, put your gun in the dishwasher instead. A good, stiff cleaning rod is best; especially when it is a nice flexible cleaning cord. One should always use a 1 piece rod, the 3 sectioned ones travel better. Clean your gun at the range, but its OK to wait until you get home. Never use {whatever} to clean your rifle, it will cause flash rust within .0352 microseconds; its far better to use {another whatever} because it will cause buildup that will clog your barrel the very first time its used. Its best to use the {whatever military} cleaning technique except its outdated and ineffective; better to use the technique employed by {whatever police dept.} as everyone knows all cops' guns are perpetually dirty. The 15 step, all intensive, 3 hour, 18 patch method is best, just run 1 patch through the bbl and throw the gun back in the truck for next time.

That should pretty much sum up where this thread will end up going - did I miss anything?

I think you got it all.  Mostly, anyway. :)

Offline handgun2

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2017, 08:58:05 PM »
ok, I'll ask.  Zormpas,

(again, just asking,  how do you explain all the rounds Joel has put thru his Kadet .22lr barrel?  I think last count around 50,000 rounds. and please take time to his ' I haven't cleaned it yet" posts.

we all know 'best' good procedures for cleaning after shooting. I generally agree,  however,  I also appreciate being able to shoot, shoot again, shoot a lot.. again before a good cleaning.  And, the CZ's I own, just seem to love it.. practical accuracy still same.

respectfully,
K in MI

Offline Joe L

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2017, 07:58:29 PM »
Just for the record, I did go on a .22 cleaning spree over Christmas, but it was because the accuracy finally did start dropping off a little on the Kadet and on a Savage 22LR rifle.  I may not have to really clean them again any time soon.  I will run one or two dry patches down the bores occasionally, but not religiously.  I DO clean the chamber, breech face, firing pin hole, extractor, ramp, and magazines regularly (400-600 rounds) on the Kadet and other .22s. 
Joe
CZ-75B 9mm and Kadet, several SIG P226's, AR-15, Savage 308 bolt gun,

Offline jameslovesjammie

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2017, 08:31:27 PM »
CZ Rimfires have hand lapped barrels.  There's really no need for a barrel break-in procedure on a barrel that is already mirror polished.

Offline painter

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2017, 08:41:48 PM »
CZ Rimfires have hand lapped barrels.  There's really no need for a barrel break-in procedure on a barrel that is already mirror polished.
I thought they were hydraulically lapped James. Did they go to hand lapping?

That would be fairly labor intensive for a ~$400 production sporter.
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Offline EddieE

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2017, 08:47:52 PM »
CZ Rimfires have hand lapped barrels.  There's really no need for a barrel break-in procedure on a barrel that is already mirror polished.

So, are the high end barrels (lilja, krieger, etc.) that I hear so much about people breaking in the barrel properly not hand lapped and they need a proper break-in procedure? If CZ is hand lapping their barrels at this price point, they must have some cheap labor!

Offline painter

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2017, 06:35:48 AM »
From the FAQ on CZ-USA... http://cz-usa.com/support/faq/  emphasis added

Q: “Why are CZ rifles so accurate?”

A: CZ rifles produced at our factory in the Czech Republic feature cold hammer forged barrels. Massive rotary hammers reshape the steel around a hardened mandrel that runs down the inside of the barrel, leaving its reverse image imprinted in the bore — the lands and grooves of rifling.

Hydraulically lapped at the factory, our barrels need no ‘break-in.’ Any burrs or irregularities that might catch the bullet jacket and create copper fowling have already been polished away by the time the barrel is fit to the rifle.

The resulting barrels have built a reputation for accuracy, from the 455 rimfire platform to the Ultimate Hunting Rifle.
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Offline jameslovesjammie

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2017, 08:45:12 AM »
Hydraulically lapped at the factory, our barrels need no ‘break-in.’ Any burrs or irregularities that might catch the bullet jacket and create copper fowling have already been polished away by the time the barrel is fit to the rifle.

Well there we go!

I've got a few photos from our borecam at work that I should share.  One is the 455 Varmint Evolution with the Bull Barrel.  It's mind blowing.

Offline painter

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Re: Barrel break-in procedure anyone?
« Reply #14 on: March 16, 2017, 09:34:31 AM »
Hydraulically lapped at the factory, our barrels need no ‘break-in.’ Any burrs or irregularities that might catch the bullet jacket and create copper fowling have already been polished away by the time the barrel is fit to the rifle.

Well there we go!

I've got a few photos from our borecam at work that I should share.  One is the 455 Varmint Evolution with the Bull Barrel.  It's mind blowing.
I'd like to see a few shots of the chamber/leade. There have been some reports on the interwebz that this has been a problem area on the 455.
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