Author Topic: Reloading regulations  (Read 605 times)

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Offline docdubz

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Reloading regulations
« on: July 09, 2017, 11:27:57 AM »
are there any federal level regulations on the reloading of ammunition or is it only a state by state thing?  I've been trying to search the internet for such regulations but haven't found much aside from leftists crying about how it should be illegal.

Reason I am asking is when I get into something I tend to get carried away.  So I cant stop thinking about the desire to try making different alloys/material combinations to cast as boolits , and I just want to make sure Im not skirting any grey areas by doing so. 

Offline ReloaderFred

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2017, 12:38:27 PM »
There are local regulations that regulate the amount of powder and primers you can store in one location, but I've been violating those for over 54 years.  Don't draw attention to yourself and you won't have a problem.

Hope this helps.

Fred
After a shooting spree, they always want to take the guns away from the people who didn't do it. - William S. Burroughs

Offline IDescribe

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2017, 01:59:11 PM »
Are you asking if it's legal to make armor piercing or explosive bullets?

Or are you thinking of melting something other than lead and pouring it into a mould?

Offline vwpieces

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2017, 04:41:31 PM »
He Must be from Kalifornia.

No regulations as far as I know about what you make or use to make ammunition.
As mentioned storage quantities of powder and primers are regulated.

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« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 05:01:59 PM by vwpieces »
Sorry, had to remove the list of firearms due to server overload. I hope you now have a more pleasant experience on this forum.

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Offline docdubz

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2017, 06:01:23 PM »
Are you asking if it's legal to make armor piercing or explosive bullets?

Or are you thinking of melting something other than lead and pouring it into a mould?

No, not intending on making armor piercing or explosive bullets.  I'm thinking of melting a couple of different metals other than lead, of the ones that aren't explicitly illegal as per federal law on armor piercing ammo, to see how they perform in my new mad-scientist bullet designs.  Just wasn't sure if there was a set amount of bullet density or composition which is a legal grey area (Im not talking about tungsten, steel, iron, brass, bronze, or beryllium copper I already know that would probably get me in trouble so Im sticking clear of them).

He Must be from Kalifornia.

No regulations as far as I know about what you make or use to make ammunition.
As mentioned storage quantities of powder and primers are regulated.

One U Tube show I enjoy is Taofledermaus. Featuring "You make it, we shoot it".

First off, you take that back now!  Second, does the weird as hell worded federal armor-piercing law only apply to purchasing? 

Offline vwpieces

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2017, 07:58:12 PM »
Is that a No?  8) 
Ive heard but not sure if it's true, in Kali there is a 10 round limit per 1/2 hour and a special tool is needed to reset the press to limit mass production.
I apologize to the California members for some lame humor at your expense. But I would not be surprised if it was Law tomorrow.

Oh, not mentioned yet... is that you can make ammo but you can not sell it. That requires a manufacturing license.

I like to purchase locally and pay cash for most of my powder and primers when I can. One Big store has clerks ask for phone numbers to associate your account to the purchase. Not that there are intentions behind them asking but I always say NO if I have something in my cart I do not want recorded or associated to me. I already have enough purchases under my name to raise flags. Paranoid?? Perhaps, but I do buy more in a year than is allowed to be stored at a time. 
Sorry, had to remove the list of firearms due to server overload. I hope you now have a more pleasant experience on this forum.

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Offline vwpieces

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2017, 08:35:56 PM »
And a proper... Welcome to the forum!
While your question seems off the wall at first read, I really never had thought about it nor came across anything saying what is or isn't, this is but that ain't.
I mean there is Factory produced ammo that may raise questions in time. One manufacturer is relatively local to me making some pretty neat machined solid copper bullets. I would like to work there.

While Legal here, another nearby state does not allow hollow point bullets.
Self defense carry ammunition is not something I would make and use as my personal carry ammo. While many reloaders do, I choose not to. I have actually brought up that question to a couple LEO friends and was advised against it when I asked their opinion. Just buy a box of factory SD and leave the liability or intent off the table if something should ever happen, I was told.

Just don't make any ammo that could hurt someone and you will be fine.

Sorry, had to remove the list of firearms due to server overload. I hope you now have a more pleasant experience on this forum.

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No thank you. Want to try my CZ P-01?
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Offline olfarhors

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2017, 09:11:41 PM »
I am not a lawyer  by any sense of the word.
 all that I know is regulations pertaining to the shipment of certain reloading materials that are considered as hazardous, and the amount of  powders/primers that one can have in storage.
 the laws as to shipping are  Federal, the laws pertaining to amounts is normally City, County, State and differ from one local to another.
 I am not familiar with making projectiles but would assume that IF it was a better mouse trap then likely the large munitions companies would already be making it.
hope that helps you some.

Offline Wobbly

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2017, 09:47:22 PM »
The only one I'm aware of is that you can't sell anything you reload. You'd need a special license to sell your reloads. As long as you're making it for yourself, then you can make as much of anything you want.

The regulation for maximum pounds of powder and primers is a fire code thing.
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Offline Son of the Gael

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2017, 10:24:30 PM »
Be aware that some materials you might use are substantially more toxic than lead, tread carefully.

Offline Boris_LA

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2017, 01:38:22 AM »
Is that a No?  8) 
Ive heard but not sure if it's true, in Kali there is a 10 round limit per 1/2 hour and a special tool is needed to reset the press to limit mass production.
I apologize to the California members for some lame humor at your expense. But I would not be surprised if it was Law tomorrow.
This is not true. There is no limit per hour. You can make them as fast as you can, but limited to 50rounds per month and must put serial numbers on each round. After they made you will need to register ammo with FFL dealer and wait for 10 days to be released back to you :o.
If its not in the rules yet, it soon may be the way its going ??? I shouldn't give them the idea, should I?

Offline SI VIS PACEM PARRABELLUM

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2017, 05:34:27 AM »
The only regulations I'm aware of are how fast I can move and the mechanical limits of my press. Like Fred said do your thing and do it quietly.

Offline Dan_69GTX

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2017, 12:39:08 PM »
 What have folks seem to be the limit for primer/powder?  I understand it is dependent upon the location, but I am curious to see what the various limits are. Thanks!
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Offline ReloaderFred

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2017, 02:41:26 PM »
My "discretionary funds" account determines my powder and primer limits.  I've never asked what the local fire codes allow, since what goes on inside my home/shop is none of government's business, and to tell you the truth, the idiot we have for a fire chief isn't qualified to tell anybody what they can, or can't, do........

Hope this helps.

Fred
After a shooting spree, they always want to take the guns away from the people who didn't do it. - William S. Burroughs

Offline andrew1220

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Re: Reloading regulations
« Reply #14 on: July 10, 2017, 03:59:16 PM »
since what goes on inside my home/shop is none of government's business, and to tell you the truth, the idiot we have for a fire chief isn't qualified to tell anybody what they can, or can't, do........

Yup. I live in a communist state like Kalifornia (Massachusetts) and they have storage limits on powder, primers, and ammunition. Also components need to be locked up at all times - including brass. Hell, even a license to carry (what's needed to buy/possess guns and ammo) is required to possess brass casings in this state.

I looked into getting a permit from the fire department since my friend's brother is the fire inspector. But when I spoke to him he had no knowledge of storage limits of powder/primers and that's when I ended my pursuit in getting a permit....

Here is the breakdown:
527 CMR 1.00: MASSACHUSETTS COMPREHENSIVE FIRE SAFETY CODE   regulates the amount of ammunition and components you are allowed to possess. Without a special permit, you can store:

    Not more than 10,000 rounds of rimfire ammunition
    Not more than 10,000 rounds of centerfire rifle/pistol ammunition
    Not more than 5,000 rounds of shotgun ammunition
    Not more than 1000 primers
    Not more than 16 pounds of smokeless powder
    Not more than 2 pounds of black powder

527 CMR 1.00 also stipulates that an ammunition storage permit can be obtained from the head of the local fire department.   With a storage permit, you can store:

    Up to 30,000 rounds of rimfire ammunition*
    Up to 50,000 rounds of centerfire rifle/pistol ammunition*
    Up to 50,000 rounds of shotgun ammunition*
    Up to 10,000 primers
    Not more than 48 pounds of smokeless powder
    Not more than 5 pounds of black powder

* Total of all ammunition cannot exceed 100,000 rounds
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 04:06:09 PM by andrew1220 »