Author Topic: CMP rifle purchase ?s  (Read 502 times)

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Online Grendel

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CMP rifle purchase ?s
« on: September 10, 2017, 10:29:25 PM »
Someone explain (in small, easily understood words), how to purchase one of their rifles. Thank you.
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Offline Wobbly

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2017, 05:42:13 AM »
This link will explain most everything. When the page opens, click on the photo of the catalog.

http://thecmp.org/cmp_sales/

I think it really helps if your gun club or youth shooting team are affiliated with CMP. There is no (or very low) fee to join, you just got to do the paperwork. Once a member, you can walk into one of their stores and select a gun, or send in a mail order.

My son ordered an M1 in one of the medium grades. The gun arrived in a few days with a new stock in its own hard shell gun case via the post office. Not a matching numbers rifle, but it looks and shoots great.



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Offline M1A4ME

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2017, 07:14:19 AM »
If you live close enough to go to the North Store (Camp Perry, OH) or the South Store (Anniston, AL) you can pick out your rifle (as long as you meet the requirements/have the paperwork).

I ordered my first one.  Got a field grade Dec. 1944 Springfield Armory M1 that still had the original barrel on it.  Very pretty wood, too, once I got it cleaned up.

The next couple were picked out of the rack at the CMP North Store.  The folks working at the stores were glad to come out from behind the counter and check out the muzzle wear for us and "set them up" in the racks so we could then look over the wood/metal and choose rifles with very good barrels.

I took home a May 1943 SA and another Dec. 1944 SA (didn't know it when I chose those two guns - the Dec. 44 M1 was made within about a week of my first one).

A few months later I went to Camp Perry for a Garand Master Instructor class and bought two H&R M1 barreled receivers (father/son project searching for H&R parts and building the two rifles up.)

They are awesome rifles.  If you get a chance, find/read a copy of Hatcher's Book of the Garand.  Gen. J. Hatcher worked in the arsenals and was involved with a lot of the work of getting the US Military a rifle to replace the 03 Springfield.  Very interesting book.  If you like it then you'd like Hatcher's Notebook as well.  Not about the M1 but all kinds of stuff on other rifles/machine guns, etc. and ammo for them and accuracy/reliability testing, problems he saw at the national rifle matches, wild/weird testing they did on guns and ammo.
Better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.  So, if you see me walking the dogs with my SIG 556R, its okay.

Offline Redcat94

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2017, 04:30:51 PM »
Here's what you need :

1. Proof of citizenship. I used my passport. 
2. Proof of recent marksmanship activity. They have a list of what's acceptable. I used my WI CCW permit. 
3. Proof of membership in a marksmanship organization. They have a list of what's acceptable. NRA doesn't count but I was able to use my Glock Sport Shooting Foundation membership. 
4. Have your application paperwork notarized. My bank teller did this for free. They didn't even ask me what it was for.

Once CMP processes everything you're good to buy rifles and ammunition for three years. Their inventory is always changing so if you don't see what you want in stock keep checking back. 
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Online Grendel

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2017, 05:02:51 PM »
Yeah. I don't belong to any clubs. However, I am a licensed  sworn peace officer. Would that suffice for 3?
Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges - Tacitus

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I wasn't born in America, but I got here as fast as I could.

Online viking499

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2017, 05:45:47 PM »
Yeah. I don't belong to any clubs. However, I am a licensed  sworn peace officer. Would that suffice for 3?

Does keeping the peace on here account for anything? ;)

Offline Redcat94

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2017, 04:53:49 AM »
I am a licensed  sworn peace officer. Would that suffice for 3?

According to the CMP ordering instructions requirement #3 is satisfied by documenting current or past military or law enforcement service. Sounds like you're covered.
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Offline armoredman

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2017, 04:56:19 AM »
Hmm, sounds interesting.

Offline tpelle

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2017, 07:15:38 AM »
The last time I bought from them, a Concealed Carry permit from any state qualified as proof of marksmanship activity.

Buy from them while you can, guys.  When the Garands run out that will be all she wrote because everything else the military bought since then has been full auto.

Offline M1A4ME

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2017, 08:46:06 AM »
The Garands.

Most of them, at some point, were carried into battle by a young American GI.  They helped (hopefully) get him through some really bad times and get hope safely when he was done.

They deserve to be taken care of, as does any good tool that has worked/served well for it's purpose.

When you pick one up, you are picking up a tool, a weapon, a piece of mechanical art.

Many years ago, on a cold foggy winter night, we were out at the little country church a couple hundred yards from my in-laws house on a WV mountain top.  Two of my wife's uncles served in Korea (both have passed away in the last 5 years).  Just out of the blue one of them looked at me and asked, "Was the M1 a 30.06?"  I told him it was.  He nodded and replied, "I thought it was, but after all these years I wasn't sure.  All I remember about the M1 was that it was heavy, and it killed good.  It killed real good."

Then that "look" in his eyes went away and we went back to talking about the guys working to get that charter bus out of the ditch in front of the church in that cold, foggy, winter rain and the dark.

I think I'll always remember that "look" and his words.  Especially when I pick up one of my M1 Garands.

I don't think you'll be sorry you bought one.

With me one wasn't enough.  I got my first one.  Within a few months I drove to Camp Perry to buy two more (one for each of my sons).  A few months after that I bought a couple barreled receivers for a father son build project.  Later, I got a couple more. 

I took my first one to a "field shoot" at an out of state range a couple weeks after I got it.  Reliable (100%) and it's a good thing as I'd not been able to shoot it prior to traveling to the range.  It was sighted in, dead on, when we started the 25 meter zeroing process.  I removed 3 rounds from the clip and got it inserted (not real easy to load a partially full clip).  We shot our five rounds and the clip popped out and hit the cement back behind me and to my right side.  I put the rifle on safe, got my arm out of the sling, laid the M1 down on the mat and sat up.  The guy to my right was sitting on his mat with a big grin on his face.  He said, "Buddy, you just made my day!"  I asked him what he meant.  He said, "The sound of that clip popping out of your rifle and hitting the ground just made my day.  I just love the way that sounds."
Better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.  So, if you see me walking the dogs with my SIG 556R, its okay.

Offline Earl Keese

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2017, 10:15:41 AM »
The Garands.

Most of them, at some point, were carried into battle by a young American GI.  They helped (hopefully) get him through some really bad times and get hope safely when he was done.

They deserve to be taken care of, as does any good tool that has worked/served well for it's purpose.

When you pick one up, you are picking up a tool, a weapon, a piece of mechanical art.

Many years ago, on a cold foggy winter night, we were out at the little country church a couple hundred yards from my in-laws house on a WV mountain top.  Two of my wife's uncles served in Korea (both have passed away in the last 5 years).  Just out of the blue one of them looked at me and asked, "Was the M1 a 30.06?"  I told him it was.  He nodded and replied, "I thought it was, but after all these years I wasn't sure.  All I remember about the M1 was that it was heavy, and it killed good.  It killed real good."

Then that "look" in his eyes went away and we went back to talking about the guys working to get that charter bus out of the ditch in front of the church in that cold, foggy, winter rain and the dark.

I think I'll always remember that "look" and his words.  Especially when I pick up one of my M1 Garands.

I don't think you'll be sorry you bought one.

With me one wasn't enough.  I got my first one.  Within a few months I drove to Camp Perry to buy two more (one for each of my sons).  A few months after that I bought a couple barreled receivers for a father son build project.  Later, I got a couple more. 

I took my first one to a "field shoot" at an out of state range a couple weeks after I got it.  Reliable (100%) and it's a good thing as I'd not been able to shoot it prior to traveling to the range.  It was sighted in, dead on, when we started the 25 meter zeroing process.  I removed 3 rounds from the clip and got it inserted (not real easy to load a partially full clip).  We shot our five rounds and the clip popped out and hit the cement back behind me and to my right side.  I put the rifle on safe, got my arm out of the sling, laid the M1 down on the mat and sat up.  The guy to my right was sitting on his mat with a big grin on his face.  He said, "Buddy, you just made my day!"  I asked him what he meant.  He said, "The sound of that clip popping out of your rifle and hitting the ground just made my day.  I just love the way that sounds."
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Online Chef Jeff

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2017, 11:35:39 AM »
The Garands.

Most of them, at some point, were carried into battle by a young American GI.  They helped (hopefully) get him through some really bad times and get hope safely when he was done.

They deserve to be taken care of, as does any good tool that has worked/served well for it's purpose.

That gave me goose bumps, and made my eyes a little misty. Thank you. My Great Uncle was a B-17 tail gunner, 8th AAF. He passed in May, about a week and a half after his 100th birthday. His Ithaca M1911A1 was in my custody until it could be given to my cousin, who lives in CA. For the time I had it in my possession, it filled me with pride every time I held it. He rarely spoke of his wartime experience, but attended each and every 8th Air Force reunion until the age of 97. These tools do, indeed, need to be treasured and preserved.
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Offline dominic135

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2017, 02:19:12 PM »
No one mentioned the cost of buying one of these historical pieces. Can anyone give an example?

Offline M1A4ME

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2017, 03:08:59 PM »
No idea what it is now.

Back in 2006 or so I think I paid $389 for my rack grade SA 44 M1 (turned out to be the most accurate M1 Garand I own, or have ever shot - ugly, but man does it shoot) and the service grade M1's were about $430 each (nicer looking but won't shoot with the ugly gun).

I'll be they are a lot more than that now.  But still worth it.

As was said in a previous post, they won't always be available, and as the number dwindles the quality/condition goes down.

And, as badly as many people talk about ebay, I've bought a bunch of good spare parts there.  Ebay the company may be pretty sorry, but many of the vendors on ebay are good folks.
Better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.  So, if you see me walking the dogs with my SIG 556R, its okay.

Offline Christophorus

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Re: CMP rifle purchase ?s
« Reply #14 on: September 17, 2017, 09:04:22 PM »
I just followed the list on the purchase page. It was simple enough and they shipped it out in just a few days. Got my service grade M1 about 2 weeks ago... still haven't had time to go shoot it yet. =(

CZ 75B Ω, 9mm
vz 82, 9mm makarov
CMP Service Grade M1 Garand, .30-06, mfg 1944

 

anything