Author Topic: Decent .22 LR ammo. Any suggestions?  (Read 668 times)

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Offline IDescribe

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Re: Decent .22 LR ammo. Any suggestions?
« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2018, 10:37:46 AM »
Remington got bought by Cerberus some time back.  Cerberus is an investment capital firm, sometimes called vampire capital firms, who operate by buying healthy  businesses and reorganizing to increase profitability, which almost always includes (and in the case of Remington Did include) the termination of senior employees with the most experience but also the highest wages, reductions in total full time employees, and reductions in development and quality control.  Remington quality control has declined ever since their acquisition by Cerberus.  And Remington filed for bankruptcy earlier this year, and Cerberus is selling off the bankrupt company.  It's SOP for investment capital firms.  Extract wealth.  Leave in ruins.

So Remington inconsistent?  Yes. Remington sucks now.  They cut back on quality control so that someone at the top could line his pockets.  And the old company so many feel loyalty is just a name now slapped on junk.

Offline ZanderMan

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Re: Decent .22 LR ammo. Any suggestions?
« Reply #31 on: June 12, 2018, 11:23:08 AM »
I always stocked with CCI MiniMag 40gr RN.
Also tried Aguila SuperExtra High Velocity 40 gr RN. The accuracy is very decent and comparable with MiniMags, but so many misfires !!!
20% of rounds don't fire first time, and some of them are fired only from the 3rd attempt. I'm not sure if I buy Aguila again.

All my .22lr results are for Witness .22lr kit. I also load Aguila .22 Colibri as a last shot to indicate that there're no more rounds cause slide never locked on the last shot.

That's odd. I've shot a few thousand rounds of Aguila rimfire and have never had a fail to fire on the initial strike.


Well, it might be an issue with a firing pin. I experience light strikes with CCI-MiniMags too, but not so often. I cleaned firing pin channel, polished firing pin and even cut firing pin spring a little bit, but …. At the same time I never had light strikes for 9mm on the same frame and trigger-hammer system.
What has been described to me (and makes sense) is that on quality rimfire ammo (CCI), the primer is “spun” into the rim so that you get full 360 degree coverage of primer all around the rim, lessening the chance of a failed primer strike.

I don’t recall ever having a failed primer strike fail again after the round is reinserted and struck somewhere else on the rim.
Used to own a CZ Jawa...

Offline Dan McGrath

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Re: Decent .22 LR ammo. Any suggestions?
« Reply #32 on: June 12, 2018, 12:09:13 PM »
Well thankyou all for the information that you have provided, much to look at and send down range....

Offline newageroman

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Re: Decent .22 LR ammo. Any suggestions?
« Reply #33 on: June 12, 2018, 02:08:45 PM »
if your not happy with any store bought ammo, they now make reloading kits for 22LR. More than what I want to do, but is an option.
Recently I've been using the federal target 325 round bulk boxes and they are pretty good accuracy and can't remember last time I had one not light off. I just bought a box of the 525 Federal bulk boxes and cant wait to tear into it, as it's what I shot about 5 years ago when I first got into firearms. I also got a box of CCI SV and can't wait to try them out as well. I never knew about the SV being more accurate due to the transonic stuff, but it makes sense.

A friend of mine did give me some old thunderbolts and those were crap, constant duds, glad to be done with them and wont buy any more. Besides a couple 870 accessories, I don't see myself buying anything Remington any time soon.


Offline M1A4ME

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Re: Decent .22 LR ammo. Any suggestions?
« Reply #34 on: June 12, 2018, 03:20:25 PM »
Some guns, for the last few years, are made so you can dry fire them without damaging the firing pin/chamber.  In the old days most were not.  My dad would never allow us to handle his dad's old Western Field .22 rifle.  He said pulling the trigger on an empty chamber would result in a broken firing pin (they'd had it broken twice over the years.)  I know a guy who dinged up his Ruger Mk1 chamber to the point where it wouldn't chamber a .22 shell anymore (didn't break the firing pin, just developed a gouge in the chamber where the rim goes).

I know a Ruger 10/22 is safe to dry fire because the firing pin is made with a "stop" machined into the side of it so it hits the inside lip/edge in the bolt and stops before it makes contact with the chamber mouth.  Some manufacturing tolerance issues or a barrel not far enough back in the receiver could result in duds.

I saw an incident at an Appleseed several years ago where a mother and daughter were shooting 10/22's.  The son was shooting an old Remington bolt action .22 rifle.  As the mother/daughter had duds and would pull the bolt to the rear to eject the "dud" and chamber the next round in the magazine the "dud" would fall on the tarp they were lying on.  The son would gather up the duds at the end of each stage and lay them in a neat pile under his rifle and use them, along with some fresh ammo from the bulk pack box they all used, to shoot the next stage.  I asked and he told me his rifle was lighting off every dud they ejected.  I started picking up dud .22 ammo from Appleseeds and then, before I got around to trying them in my M52B, I forgot where I'd been putting them.  They might be down in the shed in one of the plastic gear containers I used for my sleeping bag, cooking stuff, clothes, etc. for Appleseeds and RBCs but I haven't thought to go look to check.

I accept that many people have issues with Thunderbolts.  I know that some .22 ammo just doesn't shoot worth beans in some guns (my favorite hate .22 ammo as a teenager was Winchester Wildcats, not or duds but for terrible groups from my Win. M190).
Better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.  So, if you see me walking the dogs with my SIG 556R, its okay.

Offline Rcher

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Re: Decent .22 LR ammo. Any suggestions?
« Reply #35 on: June 13, 2018, 12:06:10 AM »
I always stocked with CCI MiniMag 40gr RN.
Also tried Aguila SuperExtra High Velocity 40 gr RN. The accuracy is very decent and comparable with MiniMags, but so many misfires !!!
20% of rounds don't fire first time, and some of them are fired only from the 3rd attempt. I'm not sure if I buy Aguila again.

All my .22lr results are for Witness .22lr kit. I also load Aguila .22 Colibri as a last shot to indicate that there're no more rounds cause slide never locked on the last shot.

That's odd. I've shot a few thousand rounds of Aguila rimfire and have never had a fail to fire on the initial strike.


Well, it might be an issue with a firing pin. I experience light strikes with CCI-MiniMags too, but not so often. I cleaned firing pin channel, polished firing pin and even cut firing pin spring a little bit, but …. At the same time I never had light strikes for 9mm on the same frame and trigger-hammer system.
What has been described to me (and makes sense) is that on quality rimfire ammo (CCI), the primer is “spun” into the rim so that you get full 360 degree coverage of primer all around the rim, lessening the chance of a failed primer strike.

I don’t recall ever having a failed primer strike fail again after the round is reinserted and struck somewhere else on the rim.

That makes sense. In my case I didn't reinsert failed cartridge but cocked hammer and strike again. So it must hit the same location. Next time I'll probably eject and inspect the cartridge.

Offline jameslovesjammie

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Re: Decent .22 LR ammo. Any suggestions?
« Reply #36 on: June 13, 2018, 12:35:21 AM »
What has been described to me (and makes sense) is that on quality rimfire ammo (CCI), the primer is “spun” into the rim so that you get full 360 degree coverage of primer all around the rim, lessening the chance of a failed primer strike.

Correct.

This is a really neat video, but the section on priming starts at 3:27.


 

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